EdVenture celebrates Dr. Seuss’s 113th with "Green Eggs and Ham" - DatelineCarolina

EdVenture celebrates Dr. Seuss’s 113th with "Green Eggs and Ham"

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Every year, EdVenture holds a celebration for Dr. Seuss’s birthday. This year, Lt. Gov. Kevin Bryant read the classic Green Eggs & Ham. Every time the book said “Sam-I-Am,” Bryant asked the kids to say it with him. Every year, EdVenture holds a celebration for Dr. Seuss’s birthday. This year, Lt. Gov. Kevin Bryant read the classic Green Eggs & Ham. Every time the book said “Sam-I-Am,” Bryant asked the kids to say it with him.
The Cat in the Hat gave a big thumbs up when Lt. Gov Kevin Bryant asked him: “Cat in the Hat, do you like green eggs and ham?” The Cat in the Hat gave a big thumbs up when Lt. Gov Kevin Bryant asked him: “Cat in the Hat, do you like green eggs and ham?”
Bernadette Hampton, president of The South Carolina Education Association, read to students and talked to them about their favorite Dr. Seuss books. Students like Dr. Seuss because of the tongue twisters and rhyming. Bernadette Hampton, president of The South Carolina Education Association, read to students and talked to them about their favorite Dr. Seuss books. Students like Dr. Seuss because of the tongue twisters and rhyming.
Children that attended the event got a goodie bag, which included a book, a Cat in the Hat hat and a pencil. Children that attended the event got a goodie bag, which included a book, a Cat in the Hat hat and a pencil.
The Library Room at EdVenture Children’s museum was decorated for Dr. Seuss’ birthday. Seuss would have been 113 years old today. The Library Room at EdVenture Children’s museum was decorated for Dr. Seuss’ birthday. Seuss would have been 113 years old today.

By Micaela Wendell and Lindsey Hodges

On March the second of every year

Dr. Seuss’s birthday is here.

Read Across America celebrates with reading and more

So EdVenture had guest readers and Seuss-fun in store!

EdVenture, the Columbia children’s museum, partnered with the South Carolina Education Association on Thursday to promote literacy and a love of books in children.

Guest readers hosted pop-up readings of Dr. Seuss books for schoolchildren throughout the day, including South Carolina Lt. Gov. Kevin Bryant.

SCEA President Bernadette Hampton used her afternoon presentation of Dr. Seuss’s “The Eye Book” to announce his entrance.

“Our eyes see trees; they look at hawks. They look at bees; they look at socks,” she read. “Our eyes see flies, and now our eyes see Lieutenant Governor Kevin Bryant!”

Bryant joined the throng of children in Cat-in-the-Hat chapeaus and sat at the front “criss-cross applesauce” style with a copy of “Green Eggs And Ham.” The little crowd excitedly followed along, sometimes shouting out the next rhyming line. Bryant encouraged them to shout “Sam-I-am!” at the end of each stanza.

At the end of the reading, the Cat in the Hat himself appeared, ready to take some questions. Bryant’s hand shot up with the rest of the crowd.

“Cat in the Hat, do you like green eggs and ham?” he asked.

The Cat gave a big thumbs-up.

Hampton says that the wackiness of Dr. Seuss books draws children into reading.

“Just like the little girl said, she liked the rhymes,” Hampton said after the Q&A with the Cat. “I think that kind of keeps their attention and gets them into wanting to know more or read more.”

U.S. News and World Report recently ranked South Carolina last in the country for education, but efforts such as the SCEA Read Across America Day are helping get students excited and motivated about reading.

 In June 2014, the South Carolina General Assembly passed the Read to Succeed Act, which includes implementing personalized reading programs and free camps for students needing extra help.

“Research says that when you motivate children and you find children that spend more time reading, they do better in school,” Hampton said. “And when they do better in school, then it minimizes challenges in classroom teaching, and it really escalates student achievement, and that’s what we’re about.”

Thursday, it was all about celebrating the life and work of a beloved children’s author who made reading seem easy.

Theodor Seuss Geisel, also known as Dr. Seuss, was born on March 2, 1904 in Massachusetts. After graduating from Dartmouth College and spending a short time at Oxford University, he began his drawing and writing career with magazines in the 1920s.

He published his first book as Dr. Seuss, “And To Think I Saw It On Mulberry Street,” in 1937, and he created political cartoons during World War II while pushing out three more books. After the war, Geisel and his wife moved to La Jolla, California, where he truly kicked off his career in children’s stories.

He published 41 more books until his death in 1991, and “Daisy-Head Mayzie,” “My Many Colored Days” and “Hooray for Diffendoofer Day!” went to print in the mid-to-late 1990s after new sketches, notes and manuscripts were found after his death.

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