Juicing...Healthy or not? - DatelineCarolina

Juicing...Healthy or not?

The juice cleanse packages at Southern Squeezed come with a combination of 100% juices and almond milks. The juice cleanse packages at Southern Squeezed come with a combination of 100% juices and almond milks.
USC Dietician Jennifer Barnoud believes that natural juices have many health benefits, but warns against juice cleanses because of the lack of proteins. USC Dietician Jennifer Barnoud believes that natural juices have many health benefits, but warns against juice cleanses because of the lack of proteins.

By: Shannon O'Connell

You might have seen celebrities endorsing juicing over in Hollywood, and now Columbia has its very own dedicated juice bar. Southern Squeezed opened in July of last year, becoming the first and only dedicated juice bar in Columbia, SC.

“Juicing is a new concept in Columbia,” Katie Munshaw, the owner of Southern Squeezed says.

Customers can stop in to the store in downtown Columbia for cold-pressed juice, almond milk, wellness shots, and juice cleanse packages. You can even get a free sample of any of the almond milks or juices.

Munshaw says the juices are made with a hydraulic presser, making them 100 percent fruit and vegetable juice, no added water or sugar.

“It’s a nice way of getting fruits and vegetables in, and kind of make you think about eating healthier,” Munshaw says.

USC Student Health Center Dietician Jennifer Barnoud agrees that natural juices have lots of health benefits.

“You’re getting lots of nutrients, disease-fighting properties, vitamins, minerals, things like that,” Barnoud says

Munshaw says juice cleanses are the newest trendy diet, and people can pick up juice cleanse packages at Southern Squeezed. They come with a combination of cold-pressed juices and almond milks for a balance of vitamins and proteins.

“We recommend three of the green juices, two of the blended fruits and vegetable juices, and then one of the almond milks,” Katie explains.

Juice cleanses and diets seem like a good idea, but they really are not that healthy. In fact, it can have adverse effects like weight gain and other health problems.

“It can cause increases in blood sugar, and it’ll shoot up pretty quickly.” Barnoud says.

If it’s not really all that healthy, what is the appeal of doing a juice cleanse?

“Because people see celebrities doing it,” Munshaw says.

“It’s just kind of trendy in general. It’s like, ‘oh, Gwyneth Paltrow is having juice…” Barnoud agrees.

This doesn’t mean you shouldn’t drink juice, though. Barnoud warns against juice diets because you’re not getting all of the necessary proteins and fats necessary to maintain a balanced diet.

“A juice a day is good. You just need to be including a variety of foods and food groups to make sure you’re getting all of your nutrient needs met,” she explains.

There you have it. Juice is good for you, but juice cleanses might not be.

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