Donald Trump Not Happy with the Delegate System - DatelineCarolina

Donald Trump Not Happy with the Delegate System

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Midlands Technical College political science professor Shickre Sabbagha believes Trump is starting to figure out how important a delegate game is. Midlands Technical College political science professor Shickre Sabbagha believes Trump is starting to figure out how important a delegate game is.
Sen. Bernies Sanders has won the last seven states, but is still far back in the delegate count. Sen. Bernies Sanders has won the last seven states, but is still far back in the delegate count.

By Tim Kallal

Rigged. That is what Donald Trump is calling the way political parties choose convention delegates after losing in Colorado's primary. He has even went as far as saying Sen. Ted Cruz bought votes here.

"People in Colorado weren’t given a vote. This was the politicians. It’s not a system, there’s no voting! This [delegate distribution system] was changed in the summer to help a guy like Cruz, and it’s not right," said Trump."

Trump even took Sen. Bernie Sanders side on the subject.

"When I look at it and see all of these victories that I have, all the victories he has, then you look at the establishment and it's a corrupt deal in this country and its not fair to you people," Trump said.

Midlands Technical College Political Science Professor Shickre Sabbagha believes Trump is just starting to recognize the complexities of the election process.

"What Trump is finding out is that it is more than just speeches and just trying to get people to vote for you. You've got to have a delegate game because he is not winning and winning large enough in the various states in order to get, outright on the first vote, enough delegates to win the nominee," says Sabbagha.

Such implications also appear to be true for the Democratic outsider Sen. Bernie Sanders, who has victories in the last seven states, but is still far behind in the delegate count.

"So the Democratic party created super delegates, along with delegates, to make sure whoever the nominee has broad support both from elected officials in the Democratic party that would have to put the policy into place, as well as rank and file citizens," says Sabbagha.

The next big stop on the presidential trail for these candidates is New York on April 19th, and there is sure to be chaos all the way to the party conventions in July.
           







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