Latin American sorority sells tacos to benefit immigrant childre - DatelineCarolina

Latin American sorority sells tacos to benefit immigrant children

Licha Morales, a member of Kappa Delta Chi, helped organize the Taco Tuesday event. Licha Morales, a member of Kappa Delta Chi, helped organize the Taco Tuesday event.
Kappa Delta Chi sold homemade, authentic tacos on Greene Street. Kappa Delta Chi sold homemade, authentic tacos on Greene Street.
People protesting the court action challenging DACA in Texas. People protesting the court action challenging DACA in Texas.

By Irvin Jones

Latin American sorority Kappa Delta Chi held its first Taco Tuesday on Greene Street yesterday to raise money towards application fees for the Deferred Action For Childhood Arrivals, also known as DACA. 

DACA helps young immigrants or undocumented children live the American Dream – it helps them get a driver's license and gives them the opportunity to attend college. That Dream is not something that comes cheap, however. 

"Just one application costs $465 and that doesn't even guarantee that you'll get accepted. So if we can get applicants right now, especially with the whole presidential debate coming, a lot of people are thinking about taking away it away because its a immigration bill that Obama implemented," says Licha Morales, creator of Taco Tuesday.

DACA started in 2012, but with a new president coming into office the program could be in jeopardy.

"I support the president's order of DAPA and DACA and I will do everything I can to make sure they are kept in place. As you know, there's a court action challenging them," said presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. 

DACA recipients must renew their application every two years and pay for help filling out forms on top of the $465 they already pay.

Even with the expensive application process, DACA recipients are aware how much it benefits them. Without DACA, many young peoples' lifestyles and futures will change dramatically.

"Well it helps me a lot, it helps a lot of people. It helps you work, get a license and permit. Basically like a normal person that was born here," Says DACA recipient Marco Alcon.

Recipients are also aware of what their lives could be like without the bill.

"People would be struggling, they wouldn't be able to go to college, they wouldn't be able to drive to work because they can't get a license. They would just have a hard time," says Martin Santamaria, another program participant. 

Kappa Delta Chi hopes to help teens and make their lives a little easier. They plan to continue Taco Tuesday and other events to help DACA applicants experience the American Dream. They hope to raise money for at least four applicants.

They will have a scholarship gala at the end of the semester for those who are chosen.

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