Local bee farmer devastated by excessive rain - DatelineCarolina

Local bee farmer devastated by excessive rain

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Danny Cannon shows the field where his bees usually gather food. Danny Cannon shows the field where his bees usually gather food.
The low bee population has affected honey sales. The low bee population has affected honey sales.
Cannon uses sugar water to feed his hives. Cannon uses sugar water to feed his hives.

By: Alissa Holmes

The unusual amount of rainfall in South Carolina this year has taken a huge toll on farmers.

Bee farmer Danny Cannon said in 17 years he has never had a harvest like this years. His honey- bee farm in Lexington, South Carolina has lost bees because the excessive rain has washed away their food supply. Usually, worker bees leave their hives and go out to get food for the colony.

 "Bees need to build up their winter stores, their food supply in the fall. This fall since late September, early October we've had mostly rain or cloudy overcasts days. When rains it washes the pollen and nectar out of the plants," said Cannon.

On average South Carolina has about 4 inches of rain from October to November. This year, South Carolina has had over 20 inches of rain so far.

To combat the lack of food, Cannon now feeds his bees sugar water hoping that it will be enough for them to make it through this spell of  rainy weather. At least once a week he delivers the sugar water to over 50 hives.

"So instead of them going out to get it, it's been costing me because I have to bring it to them," explains Cannon.

He says he cant estimate how much it will cost if he has to continue feeding his bees. But he prays the rain will stop soon, so he can start producing honey again.

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