MIDLANDS woman mourns loss of brother in 9/11 attacks - DatelineCarolina

MIDLANDS woman mourns loss of brother in 9/11 attacks

Dawn Yamashiro, a midlands woman, mourns her brother who lost his life in the 9/11 attacks. Dawn Yamashiro, a midlands woman, mourns her brother who lost his life in the 9/11 attacks.
A photo of Brian Warner, the brother of a Midlands woman who lost his life on 9/11 while working in the North Tower. A photo of Brian Warner, the brother of a Midlands woman who lost his life on 9/11 while working in the North Tower.

By: Ashley Honea

It's been 14 years since that tragic Tuesday morning on September 11, 2001. For many people, they can very distinctly remember where they were, what they were doing, and who they were with when they were informed of the horrendous terrorists attacks unfolding in the universally known "city that never sleeps".

Just off of Lincoln Street stands a monument of two stone pillars, book-ending mangled steel beams from the World Trade Centers themselves. Etched into the pillars are the names of Columbia's First Responders; but for some, the memorial represents those they tried save from the crumbling towers. 

Dawn Yamashiro, a Midlands woman, is included in the tragically long list of names of those who lost a loved one during the attacks. Her brother, Brian Warner, lost his life working in the North Tower fixing computers for his company Cantor-Fitzgerald just one day before his one year anniversary at the World Trade Center. 

"I watched the buildings fall, so I knew that my brother was gone," said Yamashiro.

For her, the crisscrossed beams of the North Tower situated in the center of the memorial provide a sense of closeness to her brother, along with photos from Ground Zero.

"It just keeps him close to my heart cause there is, like I said, nothing to tie back to; there's no grave site, there's no cemetery- so anything with his name, his picture, a piece of steel from the building he was in: it just really connects me. It really connects me to him," said Yamashiro.

Although Yamashiro's brother wasn't one of the Midland's First Responders, Yamashiro believes the memorial still honors him through their service- and that he would thank them himself if he were still alive today.

"I think if he were here and a survivor, he would be one-hundred percent behind it. And I can just know he's giving our okay from above," said Yamashiro.

A 5K run and walk was hosted in memory of those who responded to the 9/11 attacks by the Tunnel to Towers Foundation. To make a donation, or learn more on their organization, please visit their website.

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