Second annual Black History Extravaganza brings old and young to - DatelineCarolina

Second annual Black History Extravaganza brings old and young together to celebrate black history

Lee Allyson Thompson, event organizer inviting crowd to participate. Lee Allyson Thompson, event organizer inviting crowd to participate.
State Rep. Bakari Sellers tells the crowd about his father, a young civil rights activist during the Orangeburg Massacre State Rep. Bakari Sellers tells the crowd about his father, a young civil rights activist during the Orangeburg Massacre

By: Anthony DeCoro

Bridging the gap between the young and old, was the topic of interest at Greenview Park's Black History Extravaganza, Monday. Members of the community and state leaders gathered to pay tribute to sacrifices made by civil rights figures and to discus progress to still be made.

The gathering, “A Celebration of Heritage From Generation to Generation,” focused on the importance celebrating the past in order to better understand how to move forward.

“One of the things that I think is a gap in our community, is not a technology gap, is not an expectation gap, but generational gap. Where there is a divide between one generation and another,” said the Reverend Aaron Bishop.

The senior crowd was excited to see that young people were interested in participating. Isola Washington-Calhoun said she is happy to see young kids participating, but wishes more would join.

"I think the young generation, I'm begging them to please take advantage of the opportunities that they have today that we did not have back in my time," said Washington-Calhoun.

Students from the University of South Carolina asked the crowd “Who am I?” in a game where they gave a brief summary of the history of a historical black figure and enlisted the crowd to guess who they were talking about.

USC student Hazel Bridges, said she enjoyed the event because she learned more about local historical figures.

“There's so many people that are a local, black history and black movements. To see what you can do, even if it's small. You don't have to Martin Luther King Jr,” said Bridges

State Representative Bakari Sellers, the keynote speaker told the audience about his father, Cleveland Sellars Jr., who was the person indicted during the Orangeburg Massacre.  The elder Sellers was convicted and jailed for participating in what authorities at the time called the “riot” that took place at Orangeburg.

“My father was the only person convicted in American history for a one-man riot,” said Sellers.

The event was punctuated by a lunch and prayer service.

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