Study says drinking coffee might be good for health - DatelineCarolina

Study says drinking coffee might be good for health

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Katie Atkinson says she drinks three cups of coffee a day to keep her awake. Katie Atkinson says she drinks three cups of coffee a day to keep her awake.
Sally Ringer likes to drink soda in the morning because of the caffeine. Sally Ringer likes to drink soda in the morning because of the caffeine.
By: Brennan Reh

Many Americans find coffee to be essential to get them through the day.  The National coffee Association says over 50 percent of American adults drink coffee daily.

Some studies have found coffee is an unhealthy habit.  A study done by the Linus Pauling Institute said that drinking coffee is associated with an increased risk of heart disease and high blood pressure.

"I haven't really thought of any negative health benefits of it because everyone drinks it and I think it's good for me.  Keeps me energized," said USC student Katie Atkinson.

Other people have alternatives to coffee.

"I like soda better than coffee just because it tastes better.  And I'm not really a big coffee fan because if I don't eat something it makes me shaky," said USC student Sally Ringer. 

A recent Harvard study that looked at the relationship between drinking coffee and morality rates found coffee is not bad for you.  The study included healthy men and women 130,000 in their 40s and 50s at the start of the study.  Harvard experts followed these adults for 18 to 24 years.  They looked at who died during this period while tracking their diet and lifestyle habits.  The lifestyle habits included how much the volunteers drank coffee.       

The study concluded that coffee drinkers may have a lower death rate among other things. 

"There have been other studies that have found a lower risk of type 2 diabetes with drinking coffee.  So there seems to be some benefits associated with not just really caffeine, but some of the phytochemicals that are present," said USC nutrition professor Dr. Brie Turner-McGrievy.

Dr. Turner-McGrievy also said that regular and decaf coffee are associated with a lower risk of liver disease.

The studies do warn that women who are pregnant or anyone having a hard time controlling their blood pressure may want to avoid coffee or switch to decaf.

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