Emma's Law passes second reading in South Carolina Statehouse - DatelineCarolina

Emma's Law passes second reading in South Carolina Statehouse

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Emma's law is named after 6-year-old Emma Longstreet, who was killed by a drunk driver in a car crash in 2012. Emma's law is named after 6-year-old Emma Longstreet, who was killed by a drunk driver in a car crash in 2012.
"I would like to see it lower, of course, but I'm only one person and looking back at it, knowing how laws are passed, it's a step." "I would like to see it lower, of course, but I'm only one person and looking back at it, knowing how laws are passed, it's a step."
Cheryl Jones shared her story with Emma's Law supporters and legislators Cheryl Jones shared her story with Emma's Law supporters and legislators

By: Lauren Hoar

Supporters rallied in front of the South Carolina Statehouse yesterday to demand a vote on the bill, Emma's Law, that includes stricter penalties for repeat and first offense drunk drivers.

Emma's Law is named after 6-year-old Emma Longstreet, who was killed by a drunk driver in a car crash in 2012.

The bill could now be just one vote away from becoming reality in the S.C. Statehouse with yesterday's unanimous vote of 112 to 0 by House members to move forward on the bill.

Emma's father, David Longstreet, says he wants the bill to pass without amendments.

The House subcommittee voted to order DUI offenders to have an ignition interlock system installed in their car for six months if their Blood Alcohol Content was higher than 0.15 percent. That's a change from the bill's original 0.12 BAC requirement.

"I would like to see it lower, of course, but I'm only one person and looking back at it, knowing how laws are passed, it's a step" said Longstreet.

At yesterday's rally, Cheryl Jones, a victim advocate for Mothers Against Drunk Driving says she shared her story in hopes that legislators would hear it and pass the bill. Her son was killed by a drunk driver in 2003.

"My son was coming from doing a good deed and the drunk driver was coming from a bachelor party and came straight through my son's car," she said, "reality set in and I realized that my son was never coming back."

The third reading for the bill will take place this week. If it is passed as it stands, it will go back to the Senate which had already passed the measure because of the House change in BAC level for final approval.

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