South Carolina's New Immigration Law Unconstitutional - DatelineCarolina

USC Students Agree With Federal Government's Challenge of SC Immigration Law

Maria Fernanda sits down to tell why she thinks the Federal Government needs to do more about illegal immigration. Maria Fernanda sits down to tell why she thinks the Federal Government needs to do more about illegal immigration.

By: Ashley Burgess

The US Justice Department is suing the South Carolina, claiming its new immigration law set to start in January is unconstitutional.  Governor Nikki Haley signed the bill back in June, saying the state was forced to pass it own law because the Federal immigration laws aren't strong enough.

South Carolina's law requires police to check the immigration status of anyone they arrest, regardless of the offense.  The law also creates an immigration enforcement unit inside the state Department of Public Safety and it allows people to sue public officials they believe are not following the law.

The new law also makes it a felony for anyone to be in the country illegally. 

USC students Maria Fernanda and Daniela Jaimes, both immigrants from South America, say they are offended by the state's new law.

"I'm definitely against what they're trying to do," says Fernanda.

"I definitely think that's racially profiling because there are American's who can look Hispanic, and they get pulled over just for looking Hispanic," says Jaimes.

Both agree the federal government needs to do more about illegal immigration.

Maria also says President Barak Obama's proposed a "Seasonal Visa", allowing immigrants to come to the US and work for six months, would be a good solution for the illegal immigration problem.

"People come here to work but the American dream isn't to come here, work and be poor just like were in their countries back home.  It's to make money and then go back home and see their families," says Fernada.

Both believe South Carolina's law violates the Fourth Amendment, establishing protection from unreasonable searches and seizures.

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