People of BBQ - DatelineCarolina

Dig into barbecue with the Carolina Reporter

Have you ever wondered where your favorite barbecue restaurant gets its pulled pork? Come along with the Carolina Reporter and watch the process of getting the pig to the plate.   More>>

  • Carolinians who love BBQMore>>

  • Andie Goodwin

    Andie Goodwin

    "No one in my family grew up on barbecue. I mean, we all love all types of food, but being from Maryland, I just wasn't exposed to it. When I eat barbecue now, I think of SEC football games or Saturdays in the spring drinking and eating with a bunch of my friends. Eating it just gives me that good feeling of all the memories I've had at school here."
    - Senior USC student, Bel Air, Md.
    "No one in my family grew up on barbecue. I mean, we all love all types of food, but being from Maryland, I just wasn't exposed to it. When I eat barbecue now, I think of SEC football games or Saturday's in the spring drinking and eating with a bunch of my friends. Eating it just gives me that good feeling of all the memories I've had at school here.
    - Senior USC student, Bel Air, Md.
  • Jason Shepard

    Jason Shepard

    "I've moved around a lot. But now that I'm in the south, I can't think of a reason not to eat barbecue. They give you a lot of food for a small price and it tastes good. It's that simple."
    - Information Resource Consultant, College of Education at USC
    “I’ve moved around a lot. But now that I’m in the South, I can’t think of a reason not to eat barbecue. They give you a lot of food for a small price, and it tastes good. It’s that simple. The whole atmosphere of it, the attitude, the people, the process is as simple as the food itself. 
    - Information Resource Consultant, College of Education at USC
  • Diane Butler

    Diane Butler

    “This is the type of stuff I grew up on in Arkansas. When you eat this type of food, you want relatives and friends to be around. That’s why I dragged all 15 of them here. With all these people and all this food, I feel at home. I can remember my daddy cooking all day long, and as kids we used to run through the smoke and you'd smell like it the rest of the day."
    -Retired military, Columbia
    “This is the type of stuff I grew up on in Arkansas. When you eat this type of food you want relatives and friends to be around, you know? That’s why I dragged all 15 of them here. I want them to enjoy what I enjoy. With all these people and all this food, I feel at home. I can remember my daddy cooking all day long and as kids we used to run through the smoke and you'd smell like it the rest of the day."
    -Retired military, Columbia
  • Jimmy Phillips

    Jimmy Phillips

    “Something about barbecue hits people in a way like I’ve never seen. It’s all about man being man, and there’s something primal about the whole thing. Starting this business has made me see barbecue in a whole different light. People don’t just eat barbecue; they hunt it. It’s part of the subculture here."
    -Owner, The Southern Belly in Columbia
    “Something about barbecue hits people in a way like I’ve never seen. It’s all about man being man and there’s something primal about the whole thing. Starting this business has made me see barbecue in a whole different light. This is the only industry where people always are asking for the cook to say how good it was.  People don’t just eat barbecue they hunt it. It’s part of the subculture here."
    -Owner, The Southern Belly in Columbia
  • Tanya Gee and Chris Coon (with children Sabin and Will)

    Tanya Gee and Chris Coon (with children Sabin and Will)

    “It’s weird, but I grew up in the South and I didn’t really eat barbecue that often. Luckily, now we eat it all the time. Barbecue just fits with the status. The status of Southern culture can be described as slow and social, which is exactly what barbecue is. The food fits the people."
    -Attorneys, Columbia
    “It’s weird, but I grew up in the south and I didn’t really eat barbecue that often. Luckily, now we eat it all the time. Barbecue just fits with the status. The status of southern culture can be described at slow and social, which is exactly what barbecue is. The food fits the people."
    -Attorneys, Columbia
  • Izzie Martin

    Izzie Martin

    “When it comes to the people of barbecue, we accept all types. It doesn’t matter where you’re from, what you are or who you know — people who love barbecue always seems to come together. Everyone comes together at one place because they want to taste something truly amazing and they can relate to each other because of it.”
    -Owner of Izzie's Custom Woodwork, Columbia
    “I know people can label southerners as racist or not as accepting as other people, but when it comes to the people of barbeque, we accept all types. It doesn’t matter where you’re from, what you are or who know, people who love barbeque always seems to come together. Everyone comes together at one place because they want to taste something truly amazing and they can relate to each other because of it.”-Owner of Izzie's Custom Woodwork, Columbia
  • SPECIAL REPORT: BBC

    SPECIAL REPORT: BBC

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